Tag Archives: short stories

A Wickedly Kidnapping

Even the mention of the Ullery boys would generate distaste to the citizens of Warren County in the early 1800’s. This wicked and notorious band of brothers had a string of illegal gaming, horse racing rings, and illegal taverns scattered throughout the area, capitalizing on the locals’ need for entertainment and socializing. Some may have even referred to them as local “gangsters”. Beginning in 1816, the law had put together enough evidence to formally charge them with causing an affray. The local law were going out on a limb that this brief stint with the law would rid the community of their dastardly business. They were very wrong.

The Ullery boys continued to plague Warren County. Petty charges were brought against them over the next two decades, resulting with nothing more than a slap on the wrist. It wasn’t until the spring of 1836, that the law finally got them on something they couldn’t get out of. The youngest Ullery boy, Stephen, was desperate to prove himself to his older brothers and to bring in revenue to their illegal endeavors. He had spotted a young mulatto boy passing through the area and he hashed a plan of capturing him and returning him to his home state of Kentucky with the claim that he was a runaway slave. Little did Stephen know, the local law enforcement had been tipped off to his plan. On May 30, 1836, Stephen and two of his friends took Commodore by force and were able to transport him through Cincinnati across the Ohio River to Kentucky.

This is when their foiled plan came to an end. Instead of being greeted by a local slave catcher, Stephen was greeted by law enforcement. The trial of Stephen Ullery vs. The State of Ohio was wrapped up within a year where he was found guilty of “unlawfully and wickedly kidnapping Commodore Perry, a free mulatto person in the state of Ohio and attempting to extradite said Commodore to the state of Kentucky.” This was the end of the Ullery boys ring of crimes that spanned over 20 years within the county.

Unlike many individuals, Commodore Perry managed to escape the fate that many people did not. He is found in later census records as a Tin Laborer in Troy, Miami County, Ohio, and he even served in the Civil War.

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

 

 

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Murder & Mystery in a Small Town – “Based on a True Story”

Today’s “Based on a True Story” is one of intrigue, adventure, and the untimely demise of  a local celebrated Civil War hero. What we are presenting are images of county records regarding Captain William R. Hoel along with a short historical fiction story based on the events that led up to his death on May 23, 1879.

William Hoel had led an adventurous life prior to the inheritance of his father’s farm “Kildere”.  He began his career as a Steamboat Captain upon the Mississippi River and on October 19, 1861, William joined the Navy and was eventually promoted to Captain. Following the Civil War and his father’s death, Captain Hoel became a farmer in the quiet village of Waynesville Ohio. Here he fathered two children with his young and beautiful wife Elizabeth. This fairy tale of the celebrated war hero turned local socialite and doting husband and father was anything but. Captain Hoel put on a great face of enjoying his domestic and stationary life, but deep down he longed for the days where he was able to move about freely. This longing soon turned into anger and abuse towards his young wife. He blamed their supposed domestic bliss for his inability to live the life he truly dreamed of.

In the desperation to rid herself of her abusive husband, Elizabeth hashed out a plan with her close friend and confidant Dr. J.B. Hough. The local doctor was well known in the community and it wasn’t uncommon for him to visit the farm and attend to the hired help. Knowing Hoel’s rage and jealousy over his young and beautiful wife, she and the doctor planned a meeting and let slip to the hired help of their plans. Upon hearing this Captain Hoel hashed his own plan to interrupt their tryst with his pistol. What he didn’t know is that the intentions of Elizabeth and Doctor Hough were anything but romantic; they were prepared for his assault upon finding them together on that fateful day.

The story goes that Captain Hoel surprised the lovers and during a scuffle with the Doctor, Hoel was accidentally shot with his own pistol. There was a makeshift investigation where Elizabeth and Dr. Hough’s stories stayed consistent. No one truly knows what went down that fateful day, all that is known is Elizabeth spent her remaining days raising her two children on Kildere Farm in peace and quiet.

Be sure to tune in next week and find out what new “Based on a True Story” we come up with!

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Initial Verdict – Clerk of Courts – Coroner’s Inquests, Box 1 Folder 1 – In this record, the acting Coroner (Justice of the Peace, William Mannington) determines the cause of death was “a pistol ball fired from a pistol (in whose hands said pistol was I am unable to say)”

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Witness Testimony – Clerk of Courts – Coroner’s Inquests, Box 1 Folder 1 – In this testimony the witness claims to have seen Mrs. Hoel and Dr. Hough embracing and kissing, which led Captain Hoel to unlock the parlor door and storm in on the two

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Captain William Hoel’s Last Will & Testament – Volume 21 Page 221

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Captain William Hoel’s Last Will & Testament – Volume 21 Page 222


Historical Fiction: Based on a True Story

Historical Fiction has played a major roll in all modern cultures. People are fascinated with retelling stories that feature characters from history or recreating “the better times” by entering fictional characters into historically accurate events. The genres of entertainment that this topic covers includes movies, plays, books, music, and operas to name a few. We also like to refer to these as the “Based on a True Story” fictions. Examples of these in modern day would be series or movies such as The Crown, The Greatest Showman, and Braveheart to name a few.

What we would like to do is take some key characters and settings from the Warren County Records Center & Archives material and come up with our own historical fiction short stories. This series will debut on Monday and a new story will be featured each Monday in March of 2018. We encourage you to follow along with various characters, situations, and landscapes from our very own history!

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