Tag Archives: Clerk of Courts

License to Drive…to Your Local County Courts: A Guide to the New Ohio Drivers License Requirements

I’ve added a new line to my resume, expert in State of Ohio ID requirements. Okay maybe that’s taking it a step too far. What I do know is that the Warren County Records Center and Archives has had a major influx of people seeking out their Public Records in order to obtain either the Standard DL-ID Card or the Compliant DL-ID Card. If you don’t know the difference you can check out all of the information, including deadlines and requirements, at the Ohio BMV Website.

What many people do not realize is that the changes in requirements for these new Compliant IDs are to comply with federal regulations and the process should be approached with a new level of preparation. Here are the key elements that you will need to prove in order to obtain your new Compliant ID:

  • Full Legal Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Legal Presence in the US
  • Social Security Number
  • Ohio Street Address

There is a long list of documents you can provide that will prove these requirements for you. Where it gets tricky and where we get involved are in the following records:

  • Birth Certificate
  • Certified Copy of Marriage
  • Certified Copy of Divorce Decree

While the Warren County Records Center & Archives may house many of these historic documents, we are not qualified to certify them and we are also not permitted to provide any records that are newer than 100 years old (there may be some exceptions). This rings true for many of the Records Centers across the State of Ohio.

What do I mean by a certified copy? – A certified copy is a copy that has been signed and sealed by the qualifying department, think of a fancy embellished seal or imprint on the record. This is what makes the record official and proves that it is not counterfeit.

So why do you need these records and where do you go to get them?

Birth Certificate:

Why do I need it? – In order to prove your legal presence in the US, if you were born in the US, you will need to provide an Official Certified copy of your Birth Certificate. This is a state issued record so you will be able to obtain a copy of this in any Ohio County.

Where do I get it?Warren County Health District

Marriage Record or Name Change:

Why do I need it? – If your name appears different from that on your Birth Certificate you will need to provide a Certified Copy of your Marriage Record or a Certified Copy of Name Change. This record is kept at the Probate Court at the county in which you received your original record. So for example if you were married in Warren County, you can only obtain a Certified Copy from Warren County Probate Court.

Where do I get it?Warren County Probate Court

Certified Copy of Decree of Divorce, Dissolution, or Annulment of Marriage:

Why do I need it? – If you have been married more than once and have changed your name with each marriage, you may have to provide a Certified Copy of each Marriage Record along with a Certified Copy of each Divorce Decree. The reason once again is to prove the legal name changes from what is listed on your Birth Certificate. This record is kept at the Clerk of Courts at the county in which the event took place. For example, if your divorce was finalized in Warren County, you can only obtain a Certified Copy from Warren County Clerk of Courts.

Where do I get it?Warren County Clerk of Courts

My hope in providing you this information is so that you are able to obtain your new license with less headache, because let’s be honest it can be extremely frustrating waiting in those long lines only to be told you do not have what you need! Although we cannot provide these records for you, our department is always happy to help point you in the right direction in order to find the correct location to obtain them! Please share this with anyone you believe may benefit from this information. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to us at archives@co.warren.oh.us or 513-695-1815.

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A Wickedly Kidnapping

Even the mention of the Ullery boys would generate distaste to the citizens of Warren County in the early 1800’s. This wicked and notorious band of brothers had a string of illegal gaming, horse racing rings, and illegal taverns scattered throughout the area, capitalizing on the locals’ need for entertainment and socializing. Some may have even referred to them as local “gangsters”. Beginning in 1816, the law had put together enough evidence to formally charge them with causing an affray. The local law were going out on a limb that this brief stint with the law would rid the community of their dastardly business. They were very wrong.

The Ullery boys continued to plague Warren County. Petty charges were brought against them over the next two decades, resulting with nothing more than a slap on the wrist. It wasn’t until the spring of 1836, that the law finally got them on something they couldn’t get out of. The youngest Ullery boy, Stephen, was desperate to prove himself to his older brothers and to bring in revenue to their illegal endeavors. He had spotted a young mulatto boy passing through the area and he hashed a plan of capturing him and returning him to his home state of Kentucky with the claim that he was a runaway slave. Little did Stephen know, the local law enforcement had been tipped off to his plan. On May 30, 1836, Stephen and two of his friends took Commodore by force and were able to transport him through Cincinnati across the Ohio River to Kentucky.

This is when their foiled plan came to an end. Instead of being greeted by a local slave catcher, Stephen was greeted by law enforcement. The trial of Stephen Ullery vs. The State of Ohio was wrapped up within a year where he was found guilty of “unlawfully and wickedly kidnapping Commodore Perry, a free mulatto person in the state of Ohio and attempting to extradite said Commodore to the state of Kentucky.” This was the end of the Ullery boys ring of crimes that spanned over 20 years within the county.

Unlike many individuals, Commodore Perry managed to escape the fate that many people did not. He is found in later census records as a Tin Laborer in Troy, Miami County, Ohio, and he even served in the Civil War.

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

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The State of Ohio vs. Stephen Ullery, October 1836

 

 


Fascinating Finds at the Archives

At a county records center you expect to find Common Pleas, Probate, and Clerk of Courts records.  While these types of records are interesting on their own, hidden treasures lurk within the files.  Below are a few fascinating finds discovered by intern Tori Roberts while processing records this summer.

A $5 bill from September, 1819.

A $5 bill from September, 1819.

Customer testimonies for Dr. Bateman's Pectoral Drops.

Customer testimonies for Dr. Bateman’s Pectoral Drops, made mostly with opium.

Poem that bound together Catherine Thompson's estate inventory list.

Poem that bound together Catherine Thompson’s estate inventory list.

Poem that bound together Jacob Christman's estate inventory list.

Poem that bound together Jacob Christman’s estate inventory list.

Phonetic Longhand Letter Paper from 1852.

Phonetic Longhand Letter Paper from 1852.