Tag Archives: archives

Happy Veterans Day!!

In 1938, November 11th officially became the federal holiday known as Armistice Day. It was originally commemorated to honor those soldiers who had served in World War I. Following World War II and the Korean War the holiday was renamed Veterans Day. In celebration of Veterans Day we have decided to honor past Warren County veterans by sharing stories that have been uncovered about them in our records.

The first of these stories is that of Isaac Beller who fought in the War of 1812. Isaac’s story was discovered by intern Tori Roberts when she came across a receipt of a land warrant sale,mixed in with an unrelated estate file. During her research to uncover who Isaac Beller was, Tori  pieced together many details from his life that would have otherwise gone unknown. Isaac Beller was born in Berkeley, WV to Jacob and Elizabeth Beller in 1787 and had a brother named Peter. Isaac and his brother relocated to Warren County and both served in the military during the War of 1812. As payment for his service Isaac was awarded a land grant of 80 acres located in Iowa. Unfortunately at some point following the war Isaac was declared an insane pauper, admitted to the Warren County Infirmary, and was appointed William Frost as his guardian. Aided by his guardian, Isaac was required to sell the acreage he had earned in order to support himself. During the early 1900’s the records from the Warren County Infirmary were destroyed and therefore we are unable to determine what ultimately happened to Isaac.

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Isaac Beller’s Notice of Sale of Land Warrant, Probate Court Civil Records Box 1 Page 14, 1853

The second veterans story we uncovered within our records is that of Christian Staley. Christian, a German immigrant, was enlisted in the 8th Regiment of the United States Infantry around May 12, 1848 until he was honorably discharged on September 28, 1848. Because of his military service, Christian was not required to produce a certificate to become fully naturalized. He fought for his new country and was not officially naturalized until 1880. Prior to his naturalization Christian was given the Soldier’s Certificate of Citizenship, showing he was a soldier.

Christian was given the Soldier’s Certificate of Citizenship, showing he was a soldier before obtaining full citizenship. This record shows he is an official citizen of the United States and is dated the same date as his other naturalization paperwork.

Christian Staley’s Soldier’s Certificate of Citizenship, 1880

Christian Staley, a German immigrant, was enlisted in the 8th Regiment of the United States Infantry around May 12, 1848 until he was honorably discharged on September 28, 1848. Because of his military service, Christian was not required to produce a certificate to become fully naturalized. He fought for his new country and was not officially naturalized until 1880.

Christian Staley’s Naturalization Paperwork, 1880

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Death Records and their Usefulness as a Research Tool

The idea of being able to use death records for research can be a morbid thought. The fact of the matter is that there is an abundance of useful information that exists within these records. First off there are numerous types of death records. For Warren County we have three types available to the general public for research: Statement & Report of Deaths by township 1885-1908, Death Records 1867-1908, and Coroners Inquests 1873-1908.

Death records can be a great place to start researching family history because they can be one of the most comprehensive record of information about the person when they passed. The death record index and Statement & Report of Deaths typically includes the following information: name, date of death, condition (married, single, widowed), age, place of death, place of birth, occupation, father & mother’s names, race, cause of death, place of residence, and who reported the death. Having all of this information in one place can easily direct researchers to their next destination of records. For instance if you know your great grandmother passed away in Warren County but are unsure of her place of birth these records can provide that information. Another useful type of family research that can be obtained from these records is family medical history.  You can track such genetic health issues such as heart disease, diabetes, asthma, cancer, etc.

Tracking the causes of death within a county is fascinating, especially if you survey this information chronologically. The causes of death become more detailed and complex as medical knowledge advanced throughout the decades. In one year you could have the cause of death listed as “kidney disease” and a few years later it is listed as “Bright’s Disease” which shows the isolation of a  type of kidney disease. You can also track the transition of what certain illnesses were reported, i.e. when influenza was previously listed as La Grippe. This also varied according to the physician or individual who reported the death. The introduction of new technology also introduced new causes of death such as “killed by cars” or “killed on railroad”.

The images below represent examples of how these records can be used. The first images include a township that kept useful comprehensive records with all of the requested information. In the next 2 images these show the first recorded death by “flux” also known as “dysentery” in the year 1868. Following this initial case there were 28 sub sequential deaths caused by the spread of dysentery throughout the county.

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Salem Township Statement of Deaths, 1887

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Salem Township Statement of Deaths, 1887

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Salem Township Statement of Deaths, 1887

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Warren County Death Record, 1867-1881

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Warren County Death Record, 1867-1888