Tag Archives: archives

Wait, Landen Lake hasn’t always been there?

This is one of our favorite local histories to teach during our Education Outreach program at J.F. Burns Elementary School. In our blog post last week “Teaching With Township Maps” we pointed out how we can help kids to tell their local history through comparing these County Maps.
 
We like to take them back to 1903, 1944, and finally to a current map. I will point out where their school is located and then ask them to tell me what is currently across the street, Landen Lake. Then I ask them to tell me what is across the street on the earlier township maps. It is so much fun to see their eyes light up when they realize that Landen Lake has not always been there! It was once known as Simpson’s Creek, which we then proceed to ask them to tell us how they think it became a lake. Their answers are always interesting and full of imagination!
 
This is one amazing example of how the historic maps can be utilized within our community. These records are open and available to the public and our staff would love to help you research properties within the area!
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Edited 1903 Deerfield Township Map

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Edited 1944 Deerfield Township Map

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Edited 2017 Deerfield Township Map


Teaching With Township Maps

Recently we pointed out a large map cabinet that is located in our reading room. (If you haven’t seen it, be sure to go over and check it out on our Facebook page using this link: Warren County Records Center and Archives FB ) The outside is unassuming and seemingly just another piece of office storage. Contained inside though is a vast collection of the history of Warren County. One of our greatest reference tools for helping patrons and genealogists are the maps contained within our Records Center and Archives reading room.

One of our favorite uses of these township maps is to teach young students how to trace their local history by utilizing the information contained within the maps. We have been able to help these students create a real connection between where their schools and neighborhoods are to what was once there. What they have found are vast changes in the types of jobs that Warren County residents may have had, whether they lived in neighborhoods like we do today, changes in transportation within the county, and how the landscape has changed drastically in just a few short decades.

Creating this connection for patrons and students is always a joy to watch because it provides an understanding of how Warren County became what it is today. These maps also provide a quick reference point for old land records. We have helped people who were looking for old family plots of land or performing house histories to determine where and who owned the land! The maps included in our map cabinet date back to the early 1900’s and include township maps, Ohio railroad maps, cemetery maps, and even some county blue prints.

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Clearcreek Township Map, Created in 1942 and approved in 1944

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Hamilton Township Map, Created in 1942 and approved in 1944


Franklin Birthday, Plat Maps, and Transportation Expansion

“The town of Franklin was laid out in the year 1796 by W.C. Schenck and D.C. Cooper as they thought…” – Recorded 12th August 1802

Continuing our celebration of William C. Schenck’s 244th birthday we would like to highlight some plat maps that we have here in the archives. The first of the two plat maps is dated 1802, originally platted in 1796. The second plat map we have is dated 1877, and proposes new corporation limits that will expand on the town.

In the less than 100 years between these maps there are significant differences in the layout of the town. William C. Schenck was a huge proponent of the Miami Erie canal prior to his death in 1821. As you can see the canal in 1877, cuts directly through the center of town. This advancement in transportation through the city led to the growth of Franklin and very likely led to the expansion proposed in the 1877 Plat Map. Another big change is the suspension bridge that crosses the Great Miami River. One change is that is not as obvious are the modifications to the river itself, in the 1877 plat map there is an addition of a hydraulic basin and hydraulic race.

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Transcription of Original Franklin Plat Map, Recorder’s Deed Book dated 1802

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Franklin Plat Map, Proposed expansion of corporation limits dated 1877

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Transcription of Original Franklin Plat Map, Recorder’s Deed Book dated 1802

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Franklin Plat Map, Proposed expansion of corporation limits dated 1877

 


“I Consent.” Invaluable Historical Records

The Warren County Records Center and archives receives a number of research requests each year. One of our favorites to handle are the marriage consents. These consents accompany our marriage record and marriage license issued records and date back to 1803.

Generally the requests that we receive regarding these relatively unknown records come from genealogists or people conducting their own family history. Early in the 1800’s the information included in a typical marriage record was: Groom’s name, Bride’s name, Date of marriage, County Clerk who issued paperwork, and sometimes the officiant name. For those people who are trying to trace their lineage back through earlier generations it is extremely inconvenient when there are no birthdays or parent’s names included in the paperwork. The reason the consents are so valuable and cool is because if someone were underage at the time of their marriage, their parent or parents would have to sign over their consent for the marriage to take place. With this additional information, researchers have been able to find family information that might forever be lost otherwise.

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Marriage Consent, August 25, 1803

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Marriage Consent, August 25, 1803

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Marriage Consent, October 22, 1816

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Marriage Consent, October 22, 1816


Vote Counting Controversy…

As we have seen in the past, the election results are not always as cut and dry as they seem. This Court of Common Pleas case “Conrod Snyder vs. John Hopkins,” following the election of Sheriff in 1823 is the perfect example!

The declared winner for Warren County Sheriff was John Hopkins, which would be the 4th year in a row in which he served as Sheriff. Prior to Mr. Hopkins, Conrod Snyder had held the position from 1817-1820. These two men, along with Allen Wright, were on the ballot of 1823.

Following the election, Mr. Snyder claimed that he was the rightful winner and accused the Clerk of Common Pleas Court along with two Associate Judges of counting the votes without waiting for the required amount of days to pass. The Clerk along with the Judges counted the votes four days after the election as opposed to the required six days. As a result they had failed to receive the poll books for Franklin Township.

As we can see from the images below, Mr. Snyder was the clear winner over Mr. Hopkins. Following the controversy, Mr. Hopkins submitted his resignation as Sheriff of Warren County. Conrod Snyder would serve just this one additional year, John Hopkins was elected to the post of Sheriff the following election season.

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Conrod Snyder vs. John Hopkins

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Conrod Snyder vs. John Hopkins


Fascinating Finds in the Archives

To coincide with our “I Found it in the Archives” contest, we have included some of the coolest items we have within our archives. The Federal Land Office in Cincinnati distributed certificates to those citizens who purchased federal lands recently acquired from the Northwest Territory and the Northwest Ordinance. These records are fascinating because they contain some notable signatures including President Thomas Jefferson, President James Madison, and first Governor of Ohio Edward Tiffin. Another fascinating fact is that one of these certificates was issued to General William C. Schenck, the founder of Franklin, Ohio.

(For more information regarding our “I Found it in the Archives” contest, please check out our facebook page: Warren County Records Center & Archives Facebook)

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Certificate of the Register of the Land-Office at Cincinnati, Daniel Antrum, signed by President Thomas Jefferson, October 23rd 1806

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Certificate of the Register of the Land-Office at Cincinnati, Colbert Watson, signed by President James Madison & Governor Edward Tiffin, July 12th 1813

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Certificate of the Register of the Land-Office at Cincinnati, General William C. Schenck, signed by President James Madison & Governor Edward Tiffin, August 20th 1812


History and Primary Documents in the Classroom: Our Experience with Educational Outreach

Educational Outreach success! We would like to thank all of the teachers from the 2015-2016 school year who invited us into their classroom and gave us the chance to interact with their students. There is no greater success than knowing you are reaching out to younger generations to share your passion for history and for these primary documents. It was incredibly rewarding to see and hear their reactions to the content provided and to answer the many questions they formed around these historically rich documents.

During the summer of 2015, our intern Shelby Dixon established our Educational Outreach program. In the process of creating lesson plans and activities, that are free and accessible to teachers, she also reached out to a number of teachers in regards to in-class visits. Our first brave soul Emily Roewer requested that we come to her 3rd grade social studies class to help them out with their local history. This visit was so great! We were able to tailor Emily’s requests as far as the materials we brought for her students which included: large aerial photographs, maps dating 1875-2004, and estate packets for important local figures.

Once we got our feet wet with this first visit other teachers quickly came on board and we ended up visiting with 2nd, 4th, and 6th graders. This being our first year with the program we appreciate all of  the teachers and schools who provided us with this invaluable learning experience. We look forward to revisiting many of these schools and improving the curriculum provided for the students.

Please stay tuned for new lesson plans this summer and feel free to reach out to us if you are interested in having us become a part of your classroom. Have a great summer!

 


Come One, Come All to Our Spectacular 3 Ring Circus

While doing some research within our archives I ran across an old hotel ledger from the National Hotel, located across the street from the Warren County Court House during the mid 1800’s. In a detailed bill, dated May 12th 1858, Charles Johnson is charged $1.50 for hay for elephant and $0.80 for oats for elephant. His stay spanned  February 22nd through May 10th. Can you imagine strolling through town and coming upon an elephant during your visit, in Lebanon Ohio, in the winter? Upon further research I was able to locate famous elephant trainer Charles Johnson, located within the index of the Circus Historical Society. This index lists him as an employee for George F. Bailey & Co. in 1866. It appears that this may be our infamous traveler who stayed in Lebanon with his elephant!

Animal menageries and the circus were present within the United States as early as 1793. In the early years they were ran as separate attractions until 1830, when promoters found a way to combine the two for one spectacular show. Exotic animals were a main attraction even prior to their participation in the show. Prior to films and mass produced photographs, this was the only opportunity for many people to view such spectacles. These shows capitalized on their popularity by traveling throughout the country by both wagons and railroad cars.

Warren County hosted a number of these traveling shows and was lucky enough to have their very own circus owner living in “The Ridge” community. James S. Totten owned and operated the “The Great Eastern Circus and Hippodrome.” The Warren County Ohio GenWeb Project has a great write up written in 1944, by Hazel Brooks. Brooks writes “Mr. Totten was the first man to transport his circus entirely by railroad.” Unfortunately due to the popularity of Barnum, Mr. Totten’s circus went out of business and some of the animals were given to the Cincinnati Zoo.

In addition to housing an elephant for some months, Warren County hosted numerous shows throughout the decades when circuses and menageries were popular. While looking through advertisements you can chronicle the changes these shows underwent through the years. What was once a small show with performances mainly by people with animals on display eventually transitioned into elaborate performances that included performances and tricks done by lions and elephants. Although many of the records for these smaller circuses do not surface often, it makes these small discoveries a treasure for local history and folklore.

 

For further reading:

Warren County Historical Society GenWeb Project

Circus Historical Society

 


#turnpiketuesday

Roads to people nowadays are a part of our lives. It’s never a question of whether we will be able to get from A-Z, our GPS will choose the fastest route utilizing the many roads within the county. In the early 1800’s this was not the case, typically there were only roads that led from one town to the next and the roads built to navigate through town. Early settlers traveled by waterway or trails that were established by the Native Americans to navigate through the county. One way that people could ensure a road that ran to their property was to propose said road to the county and pay for it. Neighbors would  occasionally get together to accomplish this goal. Many of the major routes throughout Warren County were established this very way.

Warren County Records Center & Archives has a book with a map collection of proposed free pikes within the county from the late 1800’s. The maps themselves are hand drawn and hand painted with extraordinary detail. They provide us with a snapshot of how the residents and county officials envisioned progress within the county. In addition to documenting potential progress these maps can be utilized for analyzing current progress, genealogical information, and change in the natural landscape as a result of progress. No matter the end use, these maps are beautiful and provide researchers with a rich opportunity to examine primary documents at their finest.

Map - Lebanon and Deerfield Turnpike

Lebanon and Deerfield Turnpike

Map - Halls Creek Free Pike

Halls Creek Free Pike

Map - Williams Road Improvement

Plat of The Williams Road Improvement


Happy Veterans Day!!

In 1938, November 11th officially became the federal holiday known as Armistice Day. It was originally commemorated to honor those soldiers who had served in World War I. Following World War II and the Korean War the holiday was renamed Veterans Day. In celebration of Veterans Day we have decided to honor past Warren County veterans by sharing stories that have been uncovered about them in our records.

The first of these stories is that of Isaac Beller who fought in the War of 1812. Isaac’s story was discovered by intern Tori Roberts when she came across a receipt of a land warrant sale,mixed in with an unrelated estate file. During her research to uncover who Isaac Beller was, Tori  pieced together many details from his life that would have otherwise gone unknown. Isaac Beller was born in Berkeley, WV to Jacob and Elizabeth Beller in 1787 and had a brother named Peter. Isaac and his brother relocated to Warren County and both served in the military during the War of 1812. As payment for his service Isaac was awarded a land grant of 80 acres located in Iowa. Unfortunately at some point following the war Isaac was declared an insane pauper, admitted to the Warren County Infirmary, and was appointed William Frost as his guardian. Aided by his guardian, Isaac was required to sell the acreage he had earned in order to support himself. During the early 1900’s the records from the Warren County Infirmary were destroyed and therefore we are unable to determine what ultimately happened to Isaac.

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Isaac Beller’s Notice of Sale of Land Warrant, Probate Court Civil Records Box 1 Page 14, 1853

The second veterans story we uncovered within our records is that of Christian Staley. Christian, a German immigrant, was enlisted in the 8th Regiment of the United States Infantry around May 12, 1848 until he was honorably discharged on September 28, 1848. Because of his military service, Christian was not required to produce a certificate to become fully naturalized. He fought for his new country and was not officially naturalized until 1880. Prior to his naturalization Christian was given the Soldier’s Certificate of Citizenship, showing he was a soldier.

Christian was given the Soldier’s Certificate of Citizenship, showing he was a soldier before obtaining full citizenship. This record shows he is an official citizen of the United States and is dated the same date as his other naturalization paperwork.

Christian Staley’s Soldier’s Certificate of Citizenship, 1880

Christian Staley, a German immigrant, was enlisted in the 8th Regiment of the United States Infantry around May 12, 1848 until he was honorably discharged on September 28, 1848. Because of his military service, Christian was not required to produce a certificate to become fully naturalized. He fought for his new country and was not officially naturalized until 1880.

Christian Staley’s Naturalization Paperwork, 1880