Current Exhibits

Exploding a Forgotten Town Into a Booming Society: Kings Mills

Creating an exhibit for Kings Mills was a huge challenge! This one time factory town may have been small but it packs a vast and fascinating history! The design of the exhibit has to be one of our favorites so far from the accordion time line to the wood stands, there is a lot to look at. When creating the panels we tried to keep the history of the factory, town, and family as concise as possible. We really needed a few cases to be able to include all of the information we found during our research. 

We would like to say a huge thank you to Karen Dinsmore, The Warren County Genealogical Society, Peters & King: The Birth & Evolution of The Peters Cartridge Co. & The King Powder Co. by Thomas D. Schiffer, and the Warren County Facilities Department for all of your help!

King’s Great Western Powder Company & Peters Cartridge Company

Putting together one shelf of information on any part of Kings Mills was a huge task. For the history of the two company’s that were the reason for creation and expansion of the town of Kings Mills we condensed it into a simple timeline. We were able to take the major events on the timeline created by Thomas D. Schiffer in his book Peters & King: The Birth & Evolution of the Peters Cartridge Co. & The King Powder Co.. This book is an amazing collection of images and a comprehensive history of these two companies. There was so much rich history that we had to omit from these panels about the progression of the factory and what it was like for the workers and how the production effected the land around the factory. 

Kings Mills Exhibit, Jenifer Baker - 8.24.2020 - 7Kings Mills Exhibit, Jenifer Baker - 8.24.2020 - 8

What we were able to include is a panel detailing the explosions at the factories and what the future holds for these historic buildings. The deadliest explosion occurred July 15, 1891, killing 9 people, including women and children. 

Kings Mills Exhibit, Jenifer Baker - 8.24.2020 - 5

Tori - Large Panels - 10x13 - 3

Tori - Large Panels - 10x13Tori - Medium Panels - 9x7.5 - 1

Tori - Large Panels - 10x13 - 2Family Tree Panel 24 x 13.1 (1)Person Panels 10 x 12Person Panels 10 x 12 - 2Person Panels 10 x 12 - 3Person Panels 10 x 12 - 4Will & Inventory Panels 6 x 8 - 1Will & Inventory Panels 6 x 8 - 2

100 Years of Women’s Suffrage

The Records Center & Archives newest exhibit is a break from our normal setup! We were given the opportunity to create an exhibit for Warren County in a new exhibit space. Check out our hanging panels that provide general history on suffrage in the United States, Ohio, Warren County, and the elected women of Warren County as a result of Women’s Suffrage.

Women's Suffrage Exhibit, Jenifer Baker - 3.6.2020 - 1Women's Suffrage Exhibit, Jenifer Baker - 3.6.2020 - 4Women's Suffrage Exhibit, Jenifer Baker - 3.6.2020 - 3Women's Suffrage Exhibit, Jenifer Baker - 3.6.2020 - 2

Women's Suffrage Exhibit, Jenifer Baker - 3.6.2020 - 5

Memories of Mary Haven: Stories from the Warren County Children’s Home

The Records Center & Archives newest exhibit is up and running! Be sure to stop by the Warren County Administration building to view our exhibit on Mary Haven, Warren County Children’s Home. This exhibit was created exclusively by our summer interns Abbey Search, Brandon Kot, and Dan Maharg.

What was Mary Haven Children’s Home?

Funds to create Mary Haven Children’s Home were outlined in Mary Ann Klingling’s will following her death in 1867, opening in 1874, and originally being named “The Warren County Orphan Asylum and Children’s Home”. In 1880, Isaac Jones leaves and addition $7,000 to the Mary Haven Children’s Home trust. The Children’s Home was in operation until 1996, and was eventually demolished in 2012 after years of disrepair.

The exhibit highlights the buildings history and puts together a collection of stories about the children, their interaction with the community, and staff & visitor stories.

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